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Anuradha Chenoy

HIV/AIDS AS A SECURITY THREAT TO INDIA; MULTI-TRACK DIPLOMACY BETWEEN INDIA AND PAKISTAN: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR SUSTAINABLE SECURITY
By Happymon Jacob ; Manjrika Sewak
Manohar Publishers, Delhi & RCSS Policy Studies 28 & 30, 2005, pp. 97; pp. 136, Rs. 230.00; Rs. 255.00

STABILITY THROUGH ECONOMIC COOPERATION IN A NUCLEAR ENVIRONMENT; SMALL ARMS AND THE SECURITY DEBATE IN SOUTH ASIA
By Saira Yamin ; Salma Malik and Mallika Joseph
Manohar Publishers, Delhi & RCSS Policy Studies 31 & 33, 2005, pp. 83 & pp. 89, Rs. 225.00 each

VOLUME XXIX NUMBER 12 December 2005

The Regional Centre for Strategic Studies at Colombo is amongst the few genuinely South Asian institutions with the perspective of developing an academic dialogue and policy framework that will have a South Asian vision and input. This institute gives grants to encourage research and writing on issues concerning the region and organizes seminars on themes that impact South Asia. It has made a concerted effort to work on both the traditional aspects of security as well take up issues concerning people’s security. The four volumes under review are the outcome of such research and all reflect a regional perspective.       All four volumes reflect the theme of human security, an idea that has caught the imagination of those who can see that the traditional ways of looking at security have shortcomings and need to be changed. Traditional security focused on state security, relied primarily on force, engaged with state actors and as a consequence tended to be elitist and non democratic. Moreover, it delinked the domestic from the international and often failed to provide the very security to its own people that it supposedly stood for. Human security on the other hand broadens the concept of security to include the everyday insecurities of individuals and communities and argues that security should mean freedom from want and freedom from fear. Human security thus brings within its realm aspects of life that earlier could not connect with security but needed to be connected to ensure security for all.       Happymon Jacob’s work on the deadly HIV/AIDS virus shows the need for health security in a most effective way. With more than 40 million people infected by the HIV virus and more than 20 million dead from this and 3 million annual deaths, it is recognized as the biggest human security threat of our time. The scale of this epidemic led the United Nations Security Council to make a historical move by adopting Resolution 1308, which not only addresses a health issue for the first time, but specifically links the spread of HIV/AIDS to the maintenance of global peace and security. A nation can expect a decline of 1% of its GDP each year when more than 20% of the adult population is infected with HIV.  Beyond the macro-economic level, the impact on human and social development will be much more profound. The HIV epidemic has been described as a national catastrophe as well as a threat ...


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